Your Mom's place

meat and two veg?

Go down

meat and two veg?

Post by Your Mom on Sun Mar 15, 2015 8:00 pm

Fuck that for everyday boringness. Try meat and 6 veg!

I had a hankering for good ol' fashioned roast beef and decided to really make a meal of it. This is what I did (no yorkshire pudding unfortunately, due to shitty conditions).

1 kg (2lbs) of sirloin steak
1kg ( lbs) potato
500 grms (1lb) broccoli
500 grms (1lb) carrots
500 grms (1lb) pumpkin
500 grms (1lb) beetroot
500 grms (1lb) greens (couve)

A covering of salt rubbed into the meat and cooked at 250°c for 40 minutes
Potatoes both roasted and as mashed (i haven't had mashed spuds for over 8 years) with ground pepper, butter and milk.
Batons of carrot with honey and butter
Broccoli with a white sauce made with camembert cheese.
Couve (greens) with bacon, onion and bacon sautéd in butter with shitloads of ground pepper
pumpkin (skin on) roasted
Beetroot sliced and boiled



Hunger satisfaction? Total!


Last edited by Your Mom on Sun Mar 15, 2015 10:19 pm; edited 1 time in total
avatar
Your Mom
Admin

Posts : 2172
Join date : 2015-02-26

View user profile http://yourmomsplace.ipbfree.co.uk

Back to top Go down

Re: meat and two veg?

Post by Professor Higgins on Sun Mar 15, 2015 8:10 pm

you're just boasting. Sunday lunch is nothing without yorkshire pudding! I hate you!
avatar
Professor Higgins

Posts : 61
Join date : 2015-03-04

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: meat and two veg?

Post by Your Mom on Sun Mar 15, 2015 9:15 pm

Professor Higgins wrote:you're just boasting. Sunday lunch is nothing without yorkshire pudding! I hate you!

Ha ha ha. I hate you too, faggot!

Fuck, it's a long time since I've had yorkshire pudding. I'm beginning to understand why Ronald Biggs chose to go back to Britain!
avatar
Your Mom
Admin

Posts : 2172
Join date : 2015-02-26

View user profile http://yourmomsplace.ipbfree.co.uk

Back to top Go down

Re: meat and two veg?

Post by Astrochik on Sun Mar 15, 2015 9:34 pm

Sounds great

:crying:

I just ate some guacamole

with chips

organic blue corn tortilla chips with sprouted amarenth and chia and flax seeds or some shit like that...

what's yorkshire pudding?

have I been missing out?
avatar
Astrochik

Posts : 37
Join date : 2015-03-15

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: meat and two veg?

Post by Your Mom on Sun Mar 15, 2015 10:00 pm

Yorkshire pudding is a gift of the dogs; it's what roast beef gravy was made for.

stinky


When wheat flour began to come into common use for making cakes and puddings, cooks in the north of England devised a means of making use of the fat that dropped into the dripping pan to cook a batter pudding while the meat roasted in the oven. In 1737, a recipe for 'a dripping pudding' was published in The Whole Duty of a Woman:[2]

Make a good batter as for pancakes; put in a hot toss-pan over the fire with a bit of butter to fry the bottom a little then put the pan and butter under a shoulder of mutton, instead of a dripping pan, keeping frequently shaking it by the handle and it will be light and savoury, and fit to take up when your mutton is enough; then turn it in a dish and serve it hot.

Similar instructions were published in 1747 in The Art of Cookery made Plain and Easy by Hannah Glasse under the title of 'Yorkshire pudding'. It was she who re-invented and renamed the original version, called Dripping Pudding, which had been cooked in England for centuries, although these puddings were much flatter than the puffy versions known today.[3]

The Yorkshire pudding is meant to rise, or york, in a correctly executed preparation. A 2008 ruling by the Royal Society of Chemistry has it that "A Yorkshire pudding isn't a Yorkshire pudding if it is less than four inches tall".[4]
A Yorkshire pudding filled with mashed potato, beef, gravy and vegetables.
Yorkshire Pudding cooked in 22cm dia fry pan

The Yorkshire pudding is a staple of the British Sunday lunch and in some cases is eaten as a separate course prior to the main meat dish. This was the traditional method of eating the pudding and is still common in parts of Yorkshire today. Because the rich gravy from the roast meat drippings was used up with the first course, the main meat and vegetable course was often served with a parsley or white sauce.

Traditionally, though less so now, the Yorkshire Pudding could be served as a sweet, with sugar, golden syrup, jam, or orange juice as a sauce.[citation needed]

It is often claimed that the purpose of the dish was to provide a cheap way to fill the diners, thus stretching a lesser amount of the more expensive ingredients as the Yorkshire pudding was traditionally served first.[5]

In poorer households, the pudding was often served as the main and only course. Using the drippings and blood from the roast they may have enjoyed earlier, a quick and 'stodgy' meal was made with flour, eggs and milk. This was traditionally enjoyed with a gravy or sauce of some kind, to moisten the pudding. Thus a meal included both proteins and carbohydrates - enough fuel for another day in the field.
avatar
Your Mom
Admin

Posts : 2172
Join date : 2015-02-26

View user profile http://yourmomsplace.ipbfree.co.uk

Back to top Go down

Re: meat and two veg?

Post by Your Mom on Sun Mar 15, 2015 10:17 pm

Your Mom wrote:Yorkshire pudding is a gift of the dogs; it's what roast beef gravy was made for.

stinky


When wheat flour began to come into common use for making cakes and puddings, cooks in the north of England devised a means of making use of the fat that dropped into the dripping pan to cook a batter pudding while the meat roasted in the oven. In 1737, a recipe for 'a dripping pudding' was published in The Whole Duty of a Woman:[2]

   Make a good batter as for pancakes; put in a hot toss-pan over the fire with a bit of butter to fry the bottom a little then put the pan and butter under a shoulder of mutton, instead of a dripping pan, keeping frequently shaking it by the handle and it will be light and savoury, and fit to take up when your mutton is enough; then turn it in a dish and serve it hot.

Similar instructions were published in 1747 in The Art of Cookery made Plain and Easy by Hannah Glasse under the title of 'Yorkshire pudding'. It was she who re-invented and renamed the original version, called Dripping Pudding, which had been cooked in England for centuries, although these puddings were much flatter than the puffy versions known today.[3]

The Yorkshire pudding is meant to rise, or york, in a correctly executed preparation. A 2008 ruling by the Royal Society of Chemistry has it that "A Yorkshire pudding isn't a Yorkshire pudding if it is less than four inches tall".[4]
A Yorkshire pudding filled with mashed potato, beef, gravy and vegetables.
Yorkshire Pudding cooked in 22cm dia fry pan

The Yorkshire pudding is a staple of the British Sunday lunch and in some cases is eaten as a separate course prior to the main meat dish. This was the traditional method of eating the pudding and is still common in parts of Yorkshire today. Because the rich gravy from the roast meat drippings was used up with the first course, the main meat and vegetable course was often served with a parsley or white sauce.

Traditionally, though less so now, the Yorkshire Pudding could be served as a sweet, with sugar, golden syrup, jam, or orange juice as a sauce.[citation needed]is

It is often claimed that the purpose of the dish was to provide a cheap way to fill the diners, thus stretching a lesser amount of the more expensive ingredients as the Yorkshire pudding was traditionally served first.[5]

In poorer households, the pudding was often served as the main and only course. Using the drippings and blood from the roast they may have enjoyed earlier, a quick and 'stodgy' meal was made with flour, eggs and milk. This was traditionally enjoyed with a gravy or sauce of some kind, to moisten the pudding. Thus a meal included both proteins and carbohydrates - enough fuel for another day in the field.

BTW, there are two words filtered here and for very good reason; one is z i p p y (to bogan), for obvious reasons and the other is g o d (to discourage religitards)!
avatar
Your Mom
Admin

Posts : 2172
Join date : 2015-02-26

View user profile http://yourmomsplace.ipbfree.co.uk

Back to top Go down

Re: meat and two veg?

Post by Your Mom on Sun Mar 15, 2015 10:27 pm

Astrochik wrote:Sounds great

:crying:

I just ate some guacamole

with chips

organic blue corn tortilla chips with sprouted amarenth and chia and flax seeds or some shit like that...

what's yorkshire pudding?

have I been missing out?

Is your guacamole a mash or, like myself, do you prefer to dice avocado? Amaranth first came to my attention via a brilliant work of fiction by Piers Anthony in his Tarot novel.
avatar
Your Mom
Admin

Posts : 2172
Join date : 2015-02-26

View user profile http://yourmomsplace.ipbfree.co.uk

Back to top Go down

Re: meat and two veg?

Post by Your Mom on Sun Mar 15, 2015 10:35 pm

I'm shocked, shocked I tell ya, that I never picked you as sweet before.

"but let's keep that as our little secret"
avatar
Your Mom
Admin

Posts : 2172
Join date : 2015-02-26

View user profile http://yourmomsplace.ipbfree.co.uk

Back to top Go down

Re: meat and two veg?

Post by Professor Higgins on Sat Mar 28, 2015 6:55 am

Being a northerner, yorkshire pudding is akin to chocolate for me: a gift from the gods, like manna from heaven, but it must have pure roast beef gravy
avatar
Professor Higgins

Posts : 61
Join date : 2015-03-04

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: meat and two veg?

Post by Sponsored content


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

Back to top

- Similar topics

 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum